arty kj

sucysucyfivedolla:

like it’s not “whoops I’m PREGNANT AGAIN tee hee time for an abortion!!” 

nobody fuckin does that. nobody

it’s more along the lines of

do you want an abortion or do you want to die

do you want an abortion or do you want to watch your baby die after a week

do you want an abortion or do you want your life to fall apart around you because of a child you are either unable or unfit to support

do you want to give up a fetus or a living, breathing baby

(via sorayachemaly)

A study, to appear in the Fall 2014 issue of the academic journal Perspectives on Politics, finds that the U.S. is no democracy, but instead an oligarchy, meaning profoundly corrupt, so that the answer to the study’s opening question, “Who governs? Who really rules?” in this country, is:
 
“Despite the seemingly strong empirical support in previous studies for theories of majoritarian democracy, our analyses suggest that majorities of the American public actually have little influence over the policies our government adopts. Americans do enjoy many features central to democratic governance, such as regular elections, freedom of speech and association, and a widespread (if still contested) franchise. But, …” and then they go on to say, it’s not true, and that, “America’s claims to being a democratic society are seriously threatened” by the findings in this, the first-ever comprehensive scientific study of the subject, which shows that there is instead “the nearly total failure of ‘median voter’ and other Majoritarian Electoral Democracy theories [of America]. When the preferences of economic elites and the stands of organized interest groups are controlled for, the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.”
 
To put it short: The United States is no democracy, but actually an oligarchy.

US Is an Oligarchy Not a Democracy, says Scientific Study | Common Dreams

If we had a truly independent and adversarial press in my country, this would be a big news story, but they still haven’t found that plane, so … whaddayagonnado right?

(via wilwheaton)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

sorayachemaly:

Girls and women can contort themselves into any “do better” “try harder” “lean further” “talk harder” shape they want and it will make no difference until we name sexism and misogyny for what they are. The Confidence Gap exists because we tell girls they are worth less and then they start believing it. This is not rocket science.

To become a woman, especially a woman of color, in our culture is cognitively dissonant, and girls respond differently to that experience. Girls, like boys, feel fully human, but culture tells them that they are not.

Teen Girls, Anger and Powerlessness http://huff.to/PmOvtH

misandry-mermaid:

bebinn:

Um. WHAT.
Supreme Court Justice Scalia’s wife is on the board of a crisis pregnancy center, a name for organizations that use lies, manipulation, and delay tactics to prevent people from getting an abortion. Their page on the risks of abortion is full of junk science, decades-old studies, and logical leaps, and their resources for pregnant women are virtually all deceptive crisis pregnancy centers.
No wonder Scalia defends anti-abortion harassment masking itself as “sidewalk counseling.” The Supreme Court is currently hearing a case on buffer zones outside abortion clinics, which would keep protestors a respectful (and safe) distance from patients and staff. Justice Scalia is clearly biased and should recuse himself from the case. This is ridiculous.


America in a nutshell.

misandry-mermaid:

bebinn:

Um. WHAT.

Supreme Court Justice Scalia’s wife is on the board of a crisis pregnancy center, a name for organizations that use lies, manipulation, and delay tactics to prevent people from getting an abortion. Their page on the risks of abortion is full of junk science, decades-old studies, and logical leaps, and their resources for pregnant women are virtually all deceptive crisis pregnancy centers.

No wonder Scalia defends anti-abortion harassment masking itself as “sidewalk counseling.” The Supreme Court is currently hearing a case on buffer zones outside abortion clinics, which would keep protestors a respectful (and safe) distance from patients and staff. Justice Scalia is clearly biased and should recuse himself from the case. This is ridiculous.

America in a nutshell.

(via sorayachemaly)

BREAKING NEWS: Kansas Eliminates Due Process for Teachers, Expands Privatization

eviltessmacher:

justinspoliticalcorner:

The teacher-hating GOP extremists backed by ALEC/Koch Brothers are destroying education in this country. 

They are destroying the whole country, one issue at a time…

And we are stupid enough to keep voting them in office and letting them do it.

We get what we deserve.

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament
Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):
Rwanda - 56%
Andorra - 50%
Cuba - 45%
Sweden - 45%
Seychelles - 44%
Senegal - 43%
Finland - 43%
South Africa - 42%
Nicaragua - 40%
Iceland - 40%
Norway - 40%
Mozambique - 39%
Denmark - 39%
Netherlands - 39%
Costa Rica - 39%
Timor-Leste - 39%
Belgium - 38%
Argentina - 37%
Mexico - 37%
Tanzania - 36%
Spain - 36%
Uganda - 35%
Angola - 34%
Serbia - 33%
Nepal - 33%
Germany - 33%
Macedonia - 33%
Ecuador - 32%
Slovenia - 32%
New Zealand - 32%
Algeria - 32%
Guyana - 31%
Burundi - 31%
Switzerland - 29%
Portugal - 29%
Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
Austria - 28%
Ethiopia - 28%
Afghanistan - 28%
France - 27%
Lesotho - 27%
Tunisia - 27%
Belarus - 27%
South Sudan - 27%
El Salvador - 26%
Bolivia - 25%
Iraq - 25%
Laos - 25%
Canada - 25%
Australia - 25%
Sudan - 25%
Lithuania - 25%
Vietnam - 24%
Namibia - 24%
Kazakhstan - 24%
Singapore - 24%
Liechtenstein - 24%
Croatia - 24%
Poland - 24%
Kyrgyzstan - 23%
Latvia - 23%
Bulgaria - 23%
Philippines - 23%
Pakistan - 23%
United Kingdom - 23%
Malawi - 22%
Mauritania - 22%
Czech Republic - 22%
Eritrea - 22%
Uzbekistan - 22%
Luxembourg - 22%
Peru - 22%
Italy - 21%
Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
China - 21%
Greece - 21%
Cape Verde - 21%
Estonia - 21%
Dominican Republic - 21%
Cambodia - 20%
Israel - 20%
Moldova - 20%
Bangladesh - 20%
Honduras - 20%
Monaco - 19%
Tajikistan - 19%
Mauritius - 19%
Slovak Republic - 19%
Indonesia - 19%
Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
United States - 18%
(source: World Bank)

wilsoncenter:

What do Rwanda, Afghanistan, and Iraq beat America at? Having women in congress/parliament

Countries with better representation of women in government than the United States (hat tip to our Women in Public Service Project):

  1. Rwanda - 56%
  2. Andorra - 50%
  3. Cuba - 45%
  4. Sweden - 45%
  5. Seychelles - 44%
  6. Senegal - 43%
  7. Finland - 43%
  8. South Africa - 42%
  9. Nicaragua - 40%
  10. Iceland - 40%
  11. Norway - 40%
  12. Mozambique - 39%
  13. Denmark - 39%
  14. Netherlands - 39%
  15. Costa Rica - 39%
  16. Timor-Leste - 39%
  17. Belgium - 38%
  18. Argentina - 37%
  19. Mexico - 37%
  20. Tanzania - 36%
  21. Spain - 36%
  22. Uganda - 35%
  23. Angola - 34%
  24. Serbia - 33%
  25. Nepal - 33%
  26. Germany - 33%
  27. Macedonia - 33%
  28. Ecuador - 32%
  29. Slovenia - 32%
  30. New Zealand - 32%
  31. Algeria - 32%
  32. Guyana - 31%
  33. Burundi - 31%
  34. Switzerland - 29%
  35. Portugal - 29%
  36. Trinidad and Tobago - 29%
  37. Austria - 28%
  38. Ethiopia - 28%
  39. Afghanistan - 28%
  40. France - 27%
  41. Lesotho - 27%
  42. Tunisia - 27%
  43. Belarus - 27%
  44. South Sudan - 27%
  45. El Salvador - 26%
  46. Bolivia - 25%
  47. Iraq - 25%
  48. Laos - 25%
  49. Canada - 25%
  50. Australia - 25%
  51. Sudan - 25%
  52. Lithuania - 25%
  53. Vietnam - 24%
  54. Namibia - 24%
  55. Kazakhstan - 24%
  56. Singapore - 24%
  57. Liechtenstein - 24%
  58. Croatia - 24%
  59. Poland - 24%
  60. Kyrgyzstan - 23%
  61. Latvia - 23%
  62. Bulgaria - 23%
  63. Philippines - 23%
  64. Pakistan - 23%
  65. United Kingdom - 23%
  66. Malawi - 22%
  67. Mauritania - 22%
  68. Czech Republic - 22%
  69. Eritrea - 22%
  70. Uzbekistan - 22%
  71. Luxembourg - 22%
  72. Peru - 22%
  73. Italy - 21%
  74. Boznia and Herzegovina - 21%
  75. China - 21%
  76. Greece - 21%
  77. Cape Verde - 21%
  78. Estonia - 21%
  79. Dominican Republic - 21%
  80. Cambodia - 20%
  81. Israel - 20%
  82. Moldova - 20%
  83. Bangladesh - 20%
  84. Honduras - 20%
  85. Monaco - 19%
  86. Tajikistan - 19%
  87. Mauritius - 19%
  88. Slovak Republic - 19%
  89. Indonesia - 19%
  90. Sao Tome and Principe - 18%
  91. United States - 18%

(source: World Bank)

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

stoptellingwomentosmile:

This video was shot and edited by Dean Peterson
Dean and I got in contact a few months ago. He liked the project, I liked his work, and so we made this video that documents the process behind creating STWTS posters. 

It’s important for me to show the process behind creating these pieces. Each portrait is an actual woman who has a story, who goes through this treatment daily, who has something to say about it that deserves to be heard. 

I initially decided to portray the women as drawings instead of photographs because it was my natural inclination as a portrait painter. But also, drawing someone’s portrait makes you really look at them. You have to recognize their humanity not just physically but personally. And I hope that’s what comes across when people see these portraits in the street. 

I’m rambling. Watch the video. 
Thanks to Zahira and Koku for talking so candidly with me. 

-
TF

feministsupernatural:

maymay:

“Repeat Rape: How do they get away with it?”, Part 1 of 2. (link to Part 2)

Sources:

  1. College Men: Repeat Rape and Multiple Offending Among Undetected Rapists,Lisak and Miller, 2002 [PDF, 12 pages]
  2. Navy Men: Lisak and Miller’s results were essentially duplicated in an even larger study (2,925 men): Reports of Rape Reperpetration by Newly Enlisted Male Navy Personnel, McWhorter, 2009 [PDF, 16 pages]

By dark-side-of-the-room, who writes:

These infogifs are provided RIGHTS-FREE for noncommercial purposes. Repost them anywhere. In fact, repost them EVERYWHERE. No need to credit. Link to the L&M study if possible.

Knowledge is a seed; sow it.

r

(via knowledgeequalsblackpower)

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.
1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.
2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)
3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.
5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.
6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.
8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 
The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

underunderstood:

nowyoukno:

Now You Know (Source)

This is an important event in history, especially Canadian and feminist history. So I’m going to tell you more about it.

1) The shooter had been rejected from Ecole Polytechnique prior to the shooting. He blamed this on these female students, claiming that they were feminists who ruined his life.

2) In the first classroom he entered, he demanded the men leave before shooting at the women. No man attempted to stop him as they left. Take that as you will. (Later on, several men did get injured trying to stop him in the hallways.)

3) In his suicide letter, he believed that feminists were attempting to be more powerful than men, and were trying to take men’s rights away.
4) Feminists were actually blamed by some for the massacre. The line of logic was “if feminists didn’t make women’s rights an issue, Levine wouldn’t have wanted to kill feminists!” Victim blaming at its finest.

5) The mainstream news media often did not publicize the outrage from women’s groups, and often preferred those who took a calm approach. Ironic, that.

6) Despite him literally having a hit list of feminist icons in his final letter, several newscasters questioned whether or not the shooting was a sexist act, some even denying the idea outright.

8) Many memorials for the victims have been created, and rightly so; however, some prominent ones were erected in poor neighbourhoods where many Native women were killed every day in the same time period as the shooting (see: Marker of Change, Vancouver) (see: Missing Women, Vancouver). Basically, white feminism happened. 

The entire event was nothing short of a tragedy, and I recommend that everyone read up on it and the resulting aftermath. It’s… interesting to see how the media tried to turn it into a random act of psychopathy instead of what it was (we know better now, luckily). The reactions (memorials, etc) to the deaths of these 14 White, middle class women as compared to the deaths of 60+ Native, lower class women are also “interesting” to compare. (By interesting, I mean infuriating.)

(via gothsummer)

star-anise:

So some dudes were complaining lately, “Women are telling guys to stop telling them how to dress, but not all guys are total misogynists!  Women do it to each other too!”
So. People.  Let me tell you a thing.
This is a picture of a panopticon. It’s a kind of prison.  See, it’s a giant circle, with all the cells around the rim.  The tower in the middle is where the guards are.  The guards can see into all the prisoners’ cells, but the prisoners cannot see each other, and they have difficulty seeing the guards.  Each prisoner knows that at any time, they are being watched, and if the guards see them behaving incorrectly, they will come with truncheons and beat the prisoner up.  They learn to feel that gaze on them, all the time; every movement makes them think, “What if this breaks the rules, and they see, and they come and punish me?”  Soon, prisoners don’t need guards standing over them all the time to follow the rules; they do it themselves, because that gaze is omnipresent.  Even when the guard house is empty, they still think, “What if someone is watching me?”  (This is all from Michel Foucault.  You want more on this, go read Discipline and Punish, enjoy the descriptions of medieval torture.)
The panopticon is a metaphor.  In our society, we are constantly watched, tracked, disciplined, and punished, from childhood. The school says you skipped class today.  The babysitter says you wouldn’t follow the rules.  The police saw you at the park with your friends.  We are held to valid rules, and to bullshit rules; some of them are necessary to make our society safe, and some of them just make us easier to exploit.
You are held to rules.  I am held to rules.  They vary.  As a woman, I am held to rules that say be small be pretty defer to someone else and I’m punished in different ways if I don’t obey.  My brother is held to different rules, that say be strong don’t feel dominate the situation.  We end up policing each other; we meet and he says, “Looking good,” and I remember: people are watching how I dress and how I look.  If I disobey, they will notice, and I could be punished.  I meet him after his job and ask, “Do you think you’ll be promoted soon?” and he remembers: people pay attention to whether or not I’m in charge, and if I’m not dominant, I could be punished.
Sometimes the guardhouse is empty.  Sometimes nobody is paying close attention to what I’m wearing.  Sometimes the guards don’t come to punish me, so whether or not I am pretty or attractive does not affect whether I get to own property.  (It used to: whether or not my ancestresses were married affected their legal and economic statuses hugely)
Feminism is about the work of dismantling the prison when it comes to bullshit rules.  It’s about saying that we shouldn’t be held to stupid rules based on gender.  So it’s about the work of getting rid of the cells and the watchtower, and getting rid of the guards with truncheons.  We can stop telling each other these stories about all the rules we’re held to, and we can stop punishing each other for breaking them.  My brother stops telling me, “You’ll never get a date if you dress like that.”  I stop telling him, “You need to be strong and work hard so you come out on top.”
So no, feminists don’t believe that all men everywhere are 100% misogynistic.  It’s just that a lot of women are conditioned to think that 100% of the time, there is a risk that someone is watching us, and we will be punished if the break the rules.  It is really hard work to break the social structures and the internal attitudes that imprison us.
And yes, women can enforce the panopticon.  Hell, I’ll even tell you a womanly secret: I cannot count the number of times I’ve received cruelty at the hands of fellow girls for the way I looked or dressed.  My entire middle school experience was basically that and algebra. We’re working on fixing that!  Please, do not doubt that we’ve been working on that among ourselves as a gender.  Women have spent a lot of blood, sweat, and tears trying to change how we treat each other.  Now we’re asking you to pitch in.

star-anise:

So some dudes were complaining lately, “Women are telling guys to stop telling them how to dress, but not all guys are total misogynists!  Women do it to each other too!”

So. People.  Let me tell you a thing.

This is a picture of a panopticon. It’s a kind of prison.  See, it’s a giant circle, with all the cells around the rim.  The tower in the middle is where the guards are.  The guards can see into all the prisoners’ cells, but the prisoners cannot see each other, and they have difficulty seeing the guards.  Each prisoner knows that at any time, they are being watched, and if the guards see them behaving incorrectly, they will come with truncheons and beat the prisoner up.  They learn to feel that gaze on them, all the time; every movement makes them think, “What if this breaks the rules, and they see, and they come and punish me?”  Soon, prisoners don’t need guards standing over them all the time to follow the rules; they do it themselves, because that gaze is omnipresent.  Even when the guard house is empty, they still think, “What if someone is watching me?”  (This is all from Michel Foucault.  You want more on this, go read Discipline and Punish, enjoy the descriptions of medieval torture.)

The panopticon is a metaphor.  In our society, we are constantly watched, tracked, disciplined, and punished, from childhood. The school says you skipped class today.  The babysitter says you wouldn’t follow the rules.  The police saw you at the park with your friends.  We are held to valid rules, and to bullshit rules; some of them are necessary to make our society safe, and some of them just make us easier to exploit.

You are held to rules.  I am held to rules.  They vary.  As a woman, I am held to rules that say be small be pretty defer to someone else and I’m punished in different ways if I don’t obey.  My brother is held to different rules, that say be strong don’t feel dominate the situation.  We end up policing each other; we meet and he says, “Looking good,” and I remember: people are watching how I dress and how I look.  If I disobey, they will notice, and I could be punished.  I meet him after his job and ask, “Do you think you’ll be promoted soon?” and he remembers: people pay attention to whether or not I’m in charge, and if I’m not dominant, I could be punished.

Sometimes the guardhouse is empty.  Sometimes nobody is paying close attention to what I’m wearing.  Sometimes the guards don’t come to punish me, so whether or not I am pretty or attractive does not affect whether I get to own property.  (It used to: whether or not my ancestresses were married affected their legal and economic statuses hugely)

Feminism is about the work of dismantling the prison when it comes to bullshit rules.  It’s about saying that we shouldn’t be held to stupid rules based on gender.  So it’s about the work of getting rid of the cells and the watchtower, and getting rid of the guards with truncheons.  We can stop telling each other these stories about all the rules we’re held to, and we can stop punishing each other for breaking them.  My brother stops telling me, “You’ll never get a date if you dress like that.”  I stop telling him, “You need to be strong and work hard so you come out on top.”

So no, feminists don’t believe that all men everywhere are 100% misogynistic.  It’s just that a lot of women are conditioned to think that 100% of the time, there is a risk that someone is watching us, and we will be punished if the break the rules.  It is really hard work to break the social structures and the internal attitudes that imprison us.

And yes, women can enforce the panopticon.  Hell, I’ll even tell you a womanly secret: I cannot count the number of times I’ve received cruelty at the hands of fellow girls for the way I looked or dressed.  My entire middle school experience was basically that and algebra. We’re working on fixing that!  Please, do not doubt that we’ve been working on that among ourselves as a gender.  Women have spent a lot of blood, sweat, and tears trying to change how we treat each other.  Now we’re asking you to pitch in.

(via piggyjelly)

etspiritusvitae:

rosiesays:

Oppression is cooking being “women’s work,” while the overwhelming majority of top restaurant chefs are male.

Oppression is fashion being a “silly girl thing,” while the top earning designers and CEOs in fashion are male.

Oppression is reducing women to consumers profiting a male system, even in fields that we supposedly dominate.

this is so fucking important.

(Source: regular-snowflake, via sorayachemaly)